Poly cystic Kidney Disease

Polycystic Kidney Diseases is a genetic disorder that causes many fluid filled cysts to grow in your kidneys. Unlike the usually harmless simple kidney cysts that can form in the kidneys later in life, PKD also can cause other complications or problems, such as high blood pressure, cysts in the liver, and problems with blood vessels in your brain and heart. It is a form of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that reduces kidney function and may lead to kidney failure. Frequent complications of polycystic kidney disease include dangerously high blood pressure (Hypertension), pain in the back or sides, blood in the urine (Hematuria), recurrent urinary tract infections, kidney stones, and heart valve abnormalities. Additionally, people with polycystic kidney disease have an increased risk of an abnormal bulging (an aneurysm)in a large blood vessel called the aorta or in blood vessels at the base of the brain. Aneurysms can be life-threating if they tear or rupture. The two major forms of polycystic kidney disease are distinguished by the usual age of onset and the pattern in which it is passed through families. The autosomal dominant form (sometimes called ADPKD) has signs and symptoms that typically begin in adulthood, although cysts in the kidney are often present from birth or childhood. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can be further divided into type 1 and type 2, depending on the genetic cause. The autosomal recessive form of polycystic kidney disease (sometimes called ARPKD) is much rarer and is often lethal early in life. The signs and symptoms of this condition are usually apparent at birth or in early infancy.