Analgesic Nephropathy

Analgesic nephropathy is a part of the wider clinical ‘analgesic’ syndrome, which includes neuropsychiatric, gastrointestinal, haematological, cardiovascular, and dermatological manifestations in addition to the increased risk of developing Urothelial tumours. Although the major malignancy that has been observed in association with Analgesic Nephropathy is transitional cell carcinoma, other cancers such as renal cell carcinoma and sarcoma has also been reported in the literature. Analgesic-associated tumours are more likely to be multifocal and more malignant than those unrelated to analgesics. These tumours are more likely of renal pelvic origin with frequent accompaniment of renal papillary necrosis  and kidney dysfunction. A mean phenacetin consumption of 9.1 kg, a mean exposure time of 17 years, a mean induction time of 22 years, and female sex have been reported as risk factors for these tumours.