Nephrocalcinosis

Nephrocalcinosis  is a condition in which calcium levels in the kidneys are increased. Most often, the increase in renal calcium is generalized, as opposed to the localized increase observed in calcified renal infarct and caveating granulomas of renal tuberculosis.  Determined by the underlying aetiology, though in many cases, the condition remains asymptomatic and is identified only as a radiologic abnormality.

Clinical features of  hypercalcaemic nephropathy: Relative vasopressin resistance with decreased renal concentrating ability and increased free water diuresis, manifesting as polyuria and polydipsia, Renal glycosuria, reduced glucose tubular maximum, aminoaciduria, and no glomerular proteinuria, Reversible hypertension, Renal failure. Clinical features of microscopic nephrocalcinosis include reduced concentration capacity,  Increased blood urea nitrogen (BUN), Prolongation of nephron transit time in the distal tubule, Acute pyelonephritis or calculous ureteral obstruction with renal failure.