Chronic Renal Disease

Renal failure denotes to impermanent or permanent harm to the kidneys those results in loss of usual kidney function. There are two different types of Renal failures-acute and chronic. Acute renal failure has an abrupt onset and is potentially reversible. Chronic renal failure progresses slowly over at least three months and can lead to permanent renal failure. The causes signs, treatments and consequences of acute and chronic are different. Chronic kidney disease, as defined since 2002 by the presence of kidney damage or reduced Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), affects 10% of the adult population worldwide and more than one-third of the elderly. A recent large Meta-analysis of 46 general population, high risk and CKD, including more than 2 million participants, showed that both low estimated GFR and high albuminuria were associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease and progression to End-stage renal disease (ESRD) regardless of age.